A-Town Pest Control

A-Town Pest Control A-Town Pest Control is fully committed in customer service. We service all commerical and residential properties. A-Town Pest Control specializes in all general pest as well as termiite prevention. Give us a call and tell us what's bugging you.

Daddy long legs spider These are pictures of Daddy Long Legs, commonly mistaken for Daddy Long Leg Spiders. They are not...
01/30/2013

Daddy long legs spider

These are pictures of Daddy Long Legs, commonly mistaken for Daddy Long Leg Spiders. They are not spiders, in fact, but are in the same class (Arachnids). They do not spin webs and are venomless.


In North America, two arthropods go by the name of Daddy Long Legs. There is the spider, Pholcus phalangioides, also known as the cellar spider because where they can be found in basements and wine cellars. However, in this case, these photographs are of another order of arthropod called Daddy Long Legs as well.

Belonging to the order Opiliones, (spiders are in the order Araneae) these Daddy Long Legs, aka Harvestmen, have a great deal in common with spiders. For example, they have eight legs and their mandibles resemble that of spiders. However, its abdomen and thorax are fused appearing as an oval. They also are venom less and do not have silk glands.

Harvestmen where named by farmers who saw the arthropods out in the fields during the fall, a time when they lay their eggs. They are prolific in all habitats around the United States and Canada, except for the deserts of North America. In the north, they die off by winter, but in the south, they tend to hide out in organic matter such as tree stumps and dead leaves and wait out the colder months.

Daddy Long Legs are omnivores, though some species are exclusively predators. They are nocturnal foragers, and begin to seek out food during twilight. They feed upon live insects, dead animals, and plants.

As stated above, Daddy Long Legs are not venomous. On the other hand, the Daddy Long Leg Spiders do have venom, but it is not potent enough to cause injury to human beings

01/28/2013

hope everyone is having a great monday.

A-Town Pest Control's cover photo
03/20/2012

A-Town Pest Control's cover photo

A-Town Pest Control's cover photo
03/20/2012

A-Town Pest Control's cover photo

A-Town Pest Control's cover photo
03/17/2012

A-Town Pest Control's cover photo

12/23/2011

What pest is popping up just about everywhere these days? Presidential candidates, you say? Perhaps, but we were actually thinking of bed bugs. A new survey finds that the pesky devils are steadily taking over new territory.

The study, conducted by the National Pest Management Association and the University of Kentucky, surveyed U.S. pest management professionals and found that 99 percent of respondents encountered bed bug infestations in the past year. More than eight of out ten said that bed bug infestations are increasing across the country.

This represents a sharp increase in prevalence as only 11 percent of respondents reported receiving bed bug calls more than 10 years ago.

One of the most significant findings is that bed bug encounters have become much more common in public places than the previous year, in some instances increasing by 10, 20 or nearly 30 percent.

“The increase in bed bug encounters is likely due to a combination of factors, but one thing is clear — this pest shows no signs of retreating,” noted Missy Henriksen, vice president of public affairs for NPMA. “Of most concern are the places where pest professionals are encountering bed bugs, such as schools, hospitals, and hotels/motels.”

Public vigilance is vital to controlling the spread, she said.

“Increased public awareness, education and vigilance are key in detecting and preventing bed bug infestations as these pests tend to travel undetected from place to place, breed quickly and remain one of the most challenging to treat,” added Henriksen.

Highlights
Here are several key highlights from the 2011 Bugs Without Borders Survey:

1. Nearly all professional pest management companies have received bed bug calls in the past year, as the insect spreads to nearly every corner of the country.

2. While nine out of ten respondents have treated bed bugs in apartments, condominiums and single-family homes in 2011 and 2010, in the past year reports of bed bug encounters have become more common in many other places. College dorms, hotels, nursing homes, office buildings, schools and daycare centers, hospitals, public transportation and movie theaters have all seen inicreased infestations.

3. Bed bugs continue to be the most difficult pest to treat, according to 73 percent of survey respondents. By comparison, 17 percent pointed to ants, nine percent said cockroaches and one percent said termites were the most difficult pests to control.

4. Six out of 10 respondents consider bed bug infestations a year-round phenomenon, while approximately 25 percent say that summer is the time of year when they receive more bed bug calls.

5. Visual inspection remains the most common method pest professionals use to determine if a bed bug infestation exists. However, the use of canines has grown from 16 percent to 43 percent in the past year.

6. Despite the many warnings that bed bugs are not a DIY pest, 25 percent of customers attempt to treat bed bug infestations by themselves before calling a professional. This number has decreased from the 38 percent who elected to treat bed bugs by themselves in 2010.

Bed bugs are the size and color of a flat apple seed, like to travel and will hide in suitcases, boxes and shoes to be near a food supply (humans). In addition to the mattress and headboard, bed bugs can be found behind baseboards, electrical switch plates, picture frames, wallpaper, upholstery and in furniture crevices.

More information can be found at AllThingsBedBugs.org.

Indianmeal moths
03/15/2011

Indianmeal moths

Common paper wasps
03/13/2011

Common paper wasps

mahogany wasp
03/13/2011

mahogany wasp

Yellowjackets
03/13/2011

Yellowjackets

Bee's
03/13/2011

Bee's

Harvester Ants
03/10/2011

Harvester Ants

Carpenter Ants
03/10/2011

Carpenter Ants

Brown Recluse
03/10/2011

Brown Recluse

Black Widow
03/10/2011

Black Widow

Bedbugs
03/10/2011

Bedbugs

Wolf Spiders
03/09/2011

Wolf Spiders

Bold Jumper spider's
03/09/2011

Bold Jumper spider's

Orb Weaver's
03/09/2011

Orb Weaver's

Subterranean Termites
03/09/2011

Subterranean Termites

Roaches
03/09/2011

Roaches

February 12, 2011
02/12/2011

February 12, 2011

Is this happening to your house?
02/11/2011

Is this happening to your house?

02/11/2011
http://www.medicinenet.com/

Spider Pictures Slideshow: Black Widow Spider vs. Brown Recluse Spider on MedicineNet.com
www.medicinenet.com
Watch and learn about black widow spiders and brown recluse spiders as their characteristics, dangers, and bite results are compared.
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111 Leggett St
Abilene, TX
79603

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